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Step One: Eat Breakfast With Protein Every Day

There are four parts to Step One.

  • Enough protein for your weight
  • A complex carbohydrate
  • Eaten within one hour of getting up
  • Every day

How Much Protein?

Divide your weight in pounds in half to give you the total number of protein grams you need for the day. (If you weigh more than 250, use 250 as your base). Then have 1/3 of that amount at each meal.

What Proteins are Best?

Protein powder for a shake. Many people starting the program find that a shake is the quickest and easiest way to start the day. Click here to read all about shakes.
  • Meat,fish,chicken,
  • Eggs
  • Cottage cheese, cheese,
  • Nuts and nut butters
  • Beans
You can combine these to create a breakfast with the right amount of protein for your weight. When you are starting off, it works better if you only count “dense” proteins such as those listed above. In a pinch, you can count yogurt, milk or soymilk but they won’t hold you as well.

What About Complex Carbs?

Here are some fun choices for your morning carb. Have one serving. The size of the serving will depend on your weight. If you are a little person have one half cup. If you are a big person have one cup to two cups.
  • Oatmeal
  • Brown rice
  • Wild Rice
  • Whole wheat/whole grain toast
  • Potatoes with skin
  • Whole spelt/whole grain tortillas
  • Brown rice cakes
  • Ryvita crackers
  • Whole grain waffles
  • Whole grain crackers/Wasa
  • Steel cut oats
  • Whole grain cereal
  • Beans
  • Oatmeal Pancakes

This step is hard. It may take you months to master. Don't worry about going off sugar or caffeine right now.

Why Is Breakfast So Important?

Sugar-sensitive people are notorious for not eating breakfast. Many of you have said you don't like breakfast, you aren't hungry in the morning and even the idea of eating seems horrible.

Sugar-sensitive people sometimes do seem to feel better without breakfast. That's because when you don't eat for eight or ten hours, your body thinks you are moving towards starvation mode and releases beta-endorphin to protect you from the pain of it. Sugar-sensitive people are more sensitive to the (temporary) euphoric and confidence-building effects of beta-endorphin. You don’t eat because it makes you feel strong and lean. But the beta-endorphin release masks your dropping blood sugar level. This is why you crash big time at 10 a.m. and then eat anything (usually something sweet) in sight.

We want to protect your body from the stress of the crash. We also want to help you move away from using "not eating" as a way of feeling beta-endorphin-induced confidence. There are healthier ways to achieve higher beta-endorphin.

Just eat breakfast with protein and a complex carb every morning. If you can't stand the thought of breakfast foods, eat a lunch-type meal instead. Have miso or wonton soup (the kind with chicken and shrimp added). Have corned beef hash. Have a grilled cheese sandwich. Have a burrito or chili.

Many former breakfast-haters on this program started out by having George's Shake. It is a miracle food I manufacture just for you.


Breakfast Ideas

  • Scrambled eggs and toast
  • George’s Shake
  • Cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit and a muffin
  • Pancakes or waffles made with protein powder in the batter with applesauce and yogurt
  • Ham and Cheese omelet with hash browns
  • Beef or chicken with bean burrito
  • Oatmeal with protein powder and milk or yogurt and fruit
  • Hard-boiled eggs, toast and sausage
  • Whole grain bagel with lox piled high
  • Corned beef hash and eggs with a slice of toast

Find more information in the Doing the Steps section of our Resource Center.

Go to Step Two

 

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Simple solutions for sugar sensitivity.
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